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Fascinating True Stories from the Flip Side of History

Monthly Archives: October 2017

Won Nose Job on TV

In March of 1957, 40-year-old Terry Phillips appeared on the British television show “State Your Case.” She competed against two other contestants as to who was most in need of the 100-pound (approximately $2,400 today) prize.

After the show, viewers mailed in their selection and Mrs. Phillips had won. She convinced the viewing audience that her nose was far too oversized and needed to be reduced. “I get chilblains in winter,” she said. “I scald it when I take a hot drink.”

After winning the prize, her 8-year-old daughter Shirley was upset and said, “Mummy, don’t have your nose cut off.” Her husband Bill agreed, so Terry decided to skip the surgery and donate the money to four different charities.

Bill said, “We’re all pleased she changed her mind. We’ve got sort of used to her nose over the years.”

 

Children Will Have Bugs Bunny Teeth

On April 7, 1949, Dr. George W. Hahn addressed a conference of approximately 4,000 dentists in Los Angeles with a dire warning: The laziness of modern mothers was causing their babies to get facial deformities and they will grow up to look like Bugs Bunny.

Basically, he had concluded that moms were pushing off their children’s feeding schedules, which was causing their teeth to protrude and were ultimately distorting their facial features.

“Like any other mammal, a child wants to nurse his mother when hungry. If he can’t nurse his mother, he sucks his thumb.”

Besides returning to a more normal feeding schedule, he also recommended outfitting your child with a pair of mittens made of coarse Turkish toweling to reduce that evil thumbsucking.

George Hahn - January 1978 The Angle Orthodontist
Dr. George W. Hahn. Image from the January 1978 issue of the Angle Orthodontist.
 

Elixir of Death

Useless Information Podcast

 

Sulfanilamide was considered a miracle drug when it was introduced in the mid-1930’s.  The S.E. Massengill Co. was the first to introduce sulfanilamide in a liquid form, but in their race to get it to market they never bothered to test the safety of the drug.  Within a few weeks, the AMA was notified of the deaths of six children within a ten day period, all of whom had consumed the elixir.  The FDA was contacted, but was basically powerless to do anything about it. Continue Reading